Working Forest Management Plan rules challenged

In 2013 the California Legislature passed SB 904 which created a new logging plan called a Working Forest Management Plan (WFMP).  The industry-dominated Board of Forestry was required to promulgate regulations implementing the WFMP.  True to form, the Board attempted to subvert the strong environmental requirements of the legislation.  Consequently in November Environmental Protection Information Center, Coast Action Group and challenged the regulations in court.  Forest Unlimited has financially supported this suit.

Oral arguments on the case were heard in Alamedia Superior Court on Friday April 20 and members of Forest Unlimited were there.  The Atroney General’s office and a CalFire attorney defended the regulations.  Well know attorney Sharon Duggan represented our side.  Ms. Duggan is the author of Guide to the California Forest Practice Act and Related Laws, a tome used by attorneys and ordinary citizens alike to understand forestry law.

Alan Lavine, Director of Coast Action Group, said “I think we did well in Court.  Sharon Duggan was well prepared and thorough in her presentation on the issues.   The Attorney General’s Deputy was not prepared as she admitted.  Judge was very thorough and had obviously done a lot of reading and studying and was well versed on the details.”

The Judge seemed a little upset with the AG.   For example, in response to one of his cogent questions she had no response.  The judge responded “Really -that is all you have?  Your kidding !, You must have more. That is it?  Huh.”  In contrast, Sharon Duggan did a masterful job.  After viewing Sharons’s performance, Forest Unlimited’s Executive Director Rick Coates commented “It was a pleasure to watch Sharon demonstrate her well-honed skills.  I am optimistic that the judge will rule in our favor.”

We should see the final ruling a week or so.  Hopefully, the Board of Foresty will learn that it can not just do whatever it’s wants and must actually follow the law.  Given their history, we know that is a lot to ask.

Felta Creek Logging Court Dates Set

Friends of Felta Creek have challenged the approval of a logging plan 1-17-017 SON which will damage the salmon run in Felta Creek!

Please attend these court dates if you can. Showing the judge that lots of people care about protecting Felta Creek and stopping this timber harvest plan can only strengthen our case.

May 16, 3:00pm Courtroom 18, 3055 Cleveland Avenue in Santa Rosa is the hearing to hold off timber operations.

August 17, 3:00pm Courtroom 18, 3055 Cleveland Avenue in Santa Rosa is the main trial hearing where Friends of Felta Creek is suing CalFire for approving this THP.

Coastal redwoods battle heats up along the Gualala River

by Will Parrish, Bohemian.com

The fight to save majestic coastal redwood groves in California has been waged for more than a century, starting with the campaign that created Big Basin State Park in 1902.

A RIVER TRICKLES THROUGH IT According to the EPA, the Gualala River has been “impaired” due to sediment caused by logging. - RORY MCNAMARAIn 1978, the Sierra Club dubbed its successful campaign to expand Redwood State and National Park the “last battle” of “the redwood war,” but the battles to protect this globally recognized icon of nature would only intensify.

In 1985, a junk-bond dealer named Charles Hurwitz engineered a hostile takeover of Humboldt County’s most respected logging company, Pacific Lumber, and folded it into Houston-based investment company Maxxam. Meanwhile, Louisiana-Pacific, a Georgia-Pacific spin-off, was cutting its more than 300,000 acres in Mendocino and Sonoma counties at roughly three times the forest’s rate of growth.

“We need everything that’s out there,” Louisiana-Pacific CEO Harry Merlot told the

Press Democrat in 1989 “We log to infinity. Because it’s out there and we need it all, now.”

This unruly phase of the story involves the birth of radical environmentalism on the North Coast, complete with tree sits and road blockades, and culminates in the campaign to save the largest remaining area of unprotected old-growth redwoods in California, and thus the world: the Headwaters forest, located between Fortuna and Eureka. President Bill Clinton made saving Headwaters an election pitch in 1996, and in 1999 the state and federal governments purchased 7,500 acres to establish the Headwaters Forest Reserve.

Continue reading “Coastal redwoods battle heats up along the Gualala River”

Going dry fast – Part 2

by Will Parrish, Anderson Valley Advertiser

Voluntary Measures

For years, wine industry leaders have opposed regulation on the grounds that it is burdensome and of questionable value. California agribusiness representatives have consistently maintained that they can manage their properties in an environmentally responsible manner without the need for government oversight. In the case of the wine industry, the leading edge of this effort is a marketing and certification initiative called “fish friendly farming” which has certified 100,000 acres of vineyards, including a majority of those that suckle at the banks of the Russian River.

The initiative was developed by the California Land Stewardship Institute (CLSI), a nonprofit organization based in Guerneville.

“I’m not a big fan of regulations,” the group’s executive director, Laurel Marcus, said in an interview. “I think they lead to a lot of conflict.”

Continue reading “Going dry fast – Part 2”